Something to know about museums in Italy

Italian museums- Italy from the Inside

Photo by Francesca Tosolini

Most Italian museums are closed on Mondays. Museums sell tickets until 45 minutes before the closing time. So, don’t arrive at the very last minute because they won’t let you in, even if you show them your best smile.
A museum ticket may cost between €8 and €12, with some high profile museums charging even more. Discounts are available for children and teenagers as well as for people older than 65.

{This is an excerpt from chapter 7 “Churches and museums” of the eBook “Italy from the Inside. A native Italian reveals the secrets of traveling in Italy”}

Biking in the Italian cities

 

Biking in Italy- Italy from the InsidePhoto by Francesca Tosolini

Driving a car in big Italian cities is not a very good idea since it is quite challenging. However, if you really want to experience the thrill of the drive, you may want to consider renting a scooter. Ask at the tourist office or at your hotel concierge. The bike is also a very good alternative because some cities, such as Verona or Lucca for example, are great to be explored on two wheels.

{This is an excerpt from chapter 1 “Transportation” of the eBook “Italy from the Inside. A native Italian reveals the secrets of traveling in Italy”}

Italian hotels

Italian hotels- Italy from the Inside

Photo by Francesca Tosolini

Italy offers a multitude of accommodations: bed and breakfasts, pensions, farmhouses, villas, but the most popular remains the hotel. Italian hotels do have some differences compared to the American ones, especially those that are not part of international chains.
The first thing to expect when reserving hotel rooms in Italy is that they are much smaller than the American ones. Just consider that most of the hotels in the city centers once used to be private residences. Newer constructions outside the historical centers are more likely to offer rooms that are closer to the American standard.
On top of this, note that if the hotel is part of a historical building, chances are that there is no elevator either.

PS:
In case you wonder, the photo above shows the entrance of the Liassidi Palace Hotel in Venice.

{This is an excerpt from chapter 6 “Hotels and accommodations” of the eBook “Italy from the Inside. A native Italian reveals the secrets of traveling in Italy”}